FANDOM


GE.16-06207(E) 1

Human Rights Council

Thirty-second session

Agenda item 6

Universal periodic review

Report of the Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review

Singapore

The annex is being circulated in the language of submission only.

United Nations A/HRC/32/17

General Assembly

Distr.: General 15 April 2016

Original: English A/HRC/32/17

IntroductionEdit

1. The Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review, established in accordance with Human Rights Council resolution 5/1, held its twenty-fourth session from 18 to 29 January 2016. The review of Singapore was held at the 16th meeting, on 27 January 2016. The delegation of Singapore was headed by Ambassador-at-Large, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Chan Heng Chee. At its 18th meeting, held on 29 January 2016, the Working Group adopted the report on Singapore.

2. On 12 January 2016, the Human Rights Council selected the following group of rapporteurs (troika) to facilitate the review of Singapore: Botswana, Ecuador and Maldives.

3. In accordance with paragraph 15 of the annex to Human Rights Council resolution 5/1 and paragraph 5 of the annex to Council resolution 16/21, the following documents were issued for the review of Singapore:

 (a)  A  national  report  submitted/written  presentation  made  in  accordance  with 

paragraph 15 (a) (A/HRC/WG.6/24/SGP/1);

 (b)  A  compilation  prepared  by  the  Office  of  the  United  Nations  High 

Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) in accordance with paragraph 15 (b) (A/HRC/WG.6/24/SGP/2);

 (c)  A  summary  prepared  by  OHCHR  in  acordance  with  paragraph  15  (c) 

(A/HRC/WG.6/24/SGP/3).

4. A list of questions prepared in advance by Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany, Liechtenstein, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the United States of America was transmitted to Singapore through the troika. These questions are available on the extranet of the universal periodic review.

 I.  Summary of the proceedings of the review process 
 A.  Presentation by the State under review 

5. The Permanent Representative of Singapore, Foo Kok Jwee, said that his country supported and remained committed to the universal periodic review process. It provided a framework for all States to have a conversation on their human rights achievements and challenges on equal terms. The review allowed Singapore to listen to others’ views, take stock of progress and engage its citizens and civil society, to achieve its goal of building a fair and inclusive society.

6. He noted that the review was also an opportunity for States to share their best practices and experiences. Singapore would share how it managed the enduring challenges of dealing with primordial and visceral forces of race, language and religion in its diverse society, while trying to overcome its developmental and social challenges.

7. The head of the Singaporean delegation, Ms. Chan, said that the heart of the Singapore story was finding the right political, economic and social strategies for broadly uplifting all communities in Singapore. Singapore was a multiracial society with different languages, religions and cultures. Its social harmony did not happen by chance but by deliberate choices and policies. Each community was prepared to accommodate others and not insist on its own primacy. Crucially, the majority Chinese community agreed not to assert its majoritarian status, which helped to preserve the common space for all Singaporeans.

8. The Ambassador said that the Government treasured every Singaporean. She also said that Singapore focused on the basics in the first three decades of its nationhood: security, fair opportunities for a good education, stable jobs and homeownership. In the previous 10 years, in response to a widening income gap due to globalization and the technological revolution, more was done to ensure social mobility and provide assurance for older Singaporeans, to ensure that Singapore remained an inclusive society.

9. She said that the Government remained committed to, and invested in, the relentless task of caring for Singaporeans and protecting their fundamental rights, independent of any United Nations human rights review. Singapore was determined to remain a multiracial, fair and just society, with a culture of self-reliance and mutual support, as well as sustain the bond of trust between the Government and its people that had been developed over the previous 50 years. Good governance and a forward-looking outlook were the other key ingredients for the success of Singapore.

10. She noted that Singaporean society was changing. The Government had implemented several new policies since its previous review to enhance social protection and strengthen social harmony, such as MediShield Life, the Pioneer Generation Package, and an enabling master plan for persons with disabilities. In July 2013, Singapore ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; in 2015, it signed the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination; also in 2015, Singapore acceded to the United Nations Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (Palermo Protocol).

11. The Ambassador said that, while the principles of governance of Singapore, how it protected human rights and preserved social harmony, might not fully conform to how other societies had organized themselves, Singapore had to take a practical and not an ideological approach to human rights. She noted that countries in the West had to review some of their more liberal policies because they proved inadequate in dealing with contemporary manifestations of terrorism, extremism and immigration. Every country should therefore be given the time and space to deal with its own development and advance human rights in its own way, taking into account its unique social and cultural context.

 B.  Interactive dialogue and responses by the State under review 
 12.  During  the  interactive  dialogue,  113  delegations  made  statements. 

Recommendations made during the dialogue are in section II below.

13. Nepal praised investment in education and health. It welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the signing of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, and encouraged Singapore to consider ratifying the remaining core international human rights instruments.

14. The Netherlands was willing to share experiences with Singapore on developing a national action plan on business and human rights. It expressed concern about executions and new death sentences since the previous review.

15. Israel welcomed the Prevention of Human Trafficking Act, the Protection from Harassment Act, the Workfare Income Supplement Scheme, MediShield Life, and measures regarding senior citizens and employment of persons with disabilities.

16. Nicaragua highlighted the priority given to and high investment in education and health, and improvements in the quality of life of persons with disabilities.


 17.  Nigeria appreciated efforts to strengthen social protection, education and health care. 

It welcomed the increase of women in high positions, the Legal Aid Bureau and the Criminal Legal Aid Scheme.

18. Norway encouraged Singapore to take more concrete measures to protect the human rights of sexual minorities. It expressed concern about the resumption of executions in 2014 and 2015.

19. Oman welcomed the social and economic development, harmony and cohesion among citizens, and the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

20. Pakistan appreciated efforts to foster religious and ethnic harmony, including new Muslim laws, improvements in sharia courts and a social action plan towards de-radicalization.

21. Panama noted positively the recent modification of penal legal instruments. It wished to see total freedom of information for its citizens.

22. Paraguay welcomed the enlarged subsidies to protect older persons, the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and the 2012-2016 plan to improve accessibility.

23. Peru underscored the progress made, including in implementing economic and social policies for a more just and inclusive society, and efforts to protect migrant workers.

24. The Philippines praised the great strides made in combating human trafficking, and efforts to uphold migrant workers’ rights.

25. Poland noted that there was room for improving institutional measures and cooperation with human rights mechanisms.

26. Portugal acknowledged the economic development of Singapore while regretting its ending of a de facto moratorium on the death penalty.

27. Qatar praised efforts to protect and promote human rights, particularly measures regarding education, health services and the elderly.

28. The Republic of Korea noted practical efforts to realize human rights, specifically the health-care 2020 master plan, the Silver Support Scheme and Government-paid paternity leave.

29. The Russian Federation welcomed the new policy of extending social support to citizens, particularly the elderly and those with lower incomes, and the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

30. Saudi Arabia noted achievements, in particular improved social services, provided to the elderly and those with lower incomes. 31. Senegal noted measures to improve the education system and the situation of the elderly, and to provide aid to people with low incomes.

32. Serbia welcomed efforts to uphold socioeconomic rights and enhance social cohesion, and encouraged Singapore to explore the possibility of accepting the universal standards on civil and political rights.

33. Sierra Leone encouraged Singapore to incorporate into its legislation a clear definition of all forms of discrimination against women in line with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

34. Slovakia encouraged Singapore to fully implement the Prevention of Human Trafficking Act. It expressed concern about the imposition of the death penalty. A/HRC/32/17 6

35. Slovenia welcomed programmes to promote and protect the rights of older persons.

36. South Africa regretted the decision of Singapore to resume executions in 2014.

37. Spain welcomed the progress in combating trafficking in persons, and the national plan to combat domestic violence. It encouraged repeal of section 377 A of the Penal Code.

38. Sri Lanka praised steps to guarantee the rights of its citizens. It noted its accession to the Palermo Protocol.

39. Sweden acknowledged the commitment of Singapore to the universal periodic review.

40. Switzerland reiterated that the death penalty had no deterrent effect. It expressed concern that arrests without trial were authorized under the Penal Code and other laws.

41. Tajikistan appreciated measures to preserve mutual understanding among those who followed different religions.

42. Thailand welcomed the accession of Singapore to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Palermo Protocol and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Convention against Trafficking in Persons. It noted efforts to safeguard foreign workers’ rights by strengthening the Employment of Foreign Manpower Act.

43. Timor-Leste welcomed the National Family Violence Networking System and the Inter-agency Task Force on Trafficking in Persons.

44. Trinidad and Tobago applauded the legal amendments made to better protect workers, girls and young women, and initiatives to ensure the well-being of older Singaporeans.

45. Turkey welcomed measures to expand the social security network and encouraged Singapore to further strengthen its efforts to protect women’s rights.

46. Uganda noted that many international instruments had yet to be ratified, including the Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons.

47. Ukraine acknowledged the commitment of Singapore to secularism and multiracialism to ensure equal standing and opportunities for all citizens.

48. The United Arab Emirates noted the progress in social rights and freedom of religion.

49. The United Kingdom welcomed new measures to protect migrant workers from exploitation. It urged revision to laws and regulations that could prohibit freedom of speech, media and assembly, and removal of scandalizing the judiciary as an offence.

50. The United States welcomed the Prevention of Human Trafficking Act. It expressed concern about respect for individuals’ civil and political rights, including those of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons, and restrictions on freedom of expression.

51. Uzbekistan welcomed achievements to ensure the rule of law, and the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Palermo Protocol.

52. The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and the progress in implementing the national road map for the integration of persons with disabilities into society.

53. Bangladesh appreciated the safeguarding of social harmony through legally protected respect for diversity. It noted efforts to safeguard migrants’ well-being, and welcomed strengthened social protection for low-income citizens.


 54.  Zimbabwe noted policies and programmes to improve social protection, particularly 

for the elderly and low- and middle-income groups. It welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Palermo Protocol.

55. Afghanistan welcomed the implementation of the second national plan for persons with disabilities to help them to better integrate in the community.

56. Albania welcomed measures by Singapore to provide quality and affordable care for elderly persons, putting in place programmes and relevant infrastructure. 57. Algeria welcomed measures to strengthen social welfare programmes, especially for the most destitute, and the national plan for the elderly.

58. Argentina welcomed the national action plan against trafficking in persons. It expressed concern about the use of the death penalty.

59. Australia welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the signature of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, as well as the Misuse of Drugs (Amendment) Act and the Penal Code (Amendment) Act.

60. Austria welcomed the progress achieved by Singapore since its previous review, including the protection of the rights of the elderly and persons with disabilities, and the fight against human trafficking. It encouraged extending an invitation to the Special Rapporteur on freedom of expression.

61. In response to questions on the death penalty, Singapore said no civilized society glorified in the taking of lives. Singapore applied capital punishment to deter the most serious crimes such as murder and drug trafficking.

62. Singapore said it was small and densely populated, and situated in a region with major drug trafficking centres. Ensuring Singaporeans’ fundamental right to safety and security was paramount. By being tough on crime and emphasizing rehabilitation, the system succeeded in protecting lives while having one of the world’s lowest homicide rates. Drug abuse rates were kept under control.

63. In 2012, following a regular criminal justice review and rigorous debates in Parliament, Singapore made the mandatory death penalty discretionary under very specific situations.

64. The application of corporal punishment was guided by necessity and proportionality. There were absolute limits on the number of strokes, and it was administered under highly regulated conditions.

65. Singapore enacted the Protection from Harassment Act in 2014 in response to calls for greater protection from harassment, including online harassment, from its citizens and civil society. 66. Singapore kept core treaties under review and engaged seriously with treaty bodies. While Singapore was not party to certain treaties, its domestic policies generally complied with their substance. 67. Singapore gave space for freedom of assembly without compromising order and stability. Public assemblies generally required permits, except those posing lower safety and security risks. From 2012 to 2015, 88 public demonstrations took place at the Speakers’ Corner. 68. Singapore applied preventive detention without trial only as a last resort and only under exceptional circumstances to counter serious threats against public order or national

security. The Internal Security Act was effective in addressing the threat of terrorism in the current heightened security climate. 69. Preventive detention was governed by the same robust checks and balances as normal arrests. Rehabilitation was a key component to help detainees reintegrate into society after release. Volunteers from the Religious Rehabilitation Group gave religious counselling to counter radical ideology. 70. On trafficking in persons, Singapore established an Inter-agency Task Force on Trafficking in Persons in 2010, launched a national plan of action in 2012 and enacted the Prevention of Human Trafficking Act in 2015. Singapore co-funded public awareness initiatives, and partnered with civil society to provide assistance, such as temporary employment and language lessons for victims. Singapore was one of the first to ratify the ASEAN Convention against Trafficking in Persons in January 2016. 71. Responding to a question on conscientious objectors, Singapore underscored that it had no choice but to base its defence on citizen soldiers. National service applied to all male Singaporeans and Permanent Residents, regardless of race or religion. Singapore recognized freedom of religion as a constitutional right, but allowing individuals to opt out or choose alternative forms of national service would weaken its strong public support and impact the defence of Singapore. 72. On freedom of speech, no one in Singapore was prosecuted for criticizing the Government or its policies, and many were doing so. The Constitution guaranteed the right to freedom of expression. However, there must be safeguards against those who abused this right to denigrate or offend the beliefs of others, or to incite racial or religious hatred. 73. The Online News Licensing Scheme puts print and online news on more equal regulatory footing, but did not change standards required of the content. 74. The media regulatory framework was complemented with a strong focus on promoting media and information literacy. The independent Media Literacy Council and the Inter-Ministry Cyber Wellness Steering Committee were established to achieve these goals. 75. On defamation suits involving politicians, Singapore placed great importance on the credibility of public institutions and political leaders. Libellous allegations were challenged in court. Trust and reputation were invaluable assets in Government, which Singapore did not want to see debased. 76. Singapore affirmed that lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons were part of Singaporean society and their contributions were acknowledged like those of all citizens. The Government had to manage lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex issues sensitively and pragmatically without fracturing society because Singapore was basically a conservative society. 77. Section 377 A of the Penal Code on sodomy, which was inherited during the colonial history of Singapore, was not proactively enforced. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons were free to lead their lives. Parliament decided after an intense debate in 2007 to retain this law. The Prime Minister noted at that time that it was better to accept the legal untidiness and ambiguity of leaving the law as it was, and it would not be wise to force this issue by settling it one way or the other. Singapore firmly opposed discrimination and harassment, and did not discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex applicants to the civil service. The approach was “to live and let live”, preserve the common space for all communities, and let society evolve gradually and decide collectively. A/HRC/32/17

 9 

78. Azerbaijan noted the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and accession to the Palermo Protocol. It welcomed the Inter-Racial and Religious Confidence Circles Steering Committees. 79. Bahamas welcomed the people-centred policies and programmes of Singapore, its universal health-care scheme, increased assistance to persons with disabilities, and accession to the Palermo Protocol. 80. Bahrain welcomed steps to improve living conditions, and to achieve social harmony and religious tolerance. 81. Viet Nam welcomed the achievements in protecting and promoting human rights since the previous review. 82. Barbados noted the ethnic and religious diversity. It welcomed investment in housing, health care and education, and attention for the elderly and less well-off. 83. Belarus noted the approach of Singapore to combating human trafficking. It welcomed efforts to enhance social protection, and additional investments in education, health and housing. 84. Belgium encouraged Singapore to align its domestic legislation with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. It expressed concern about minors’ still being enlisted in the army and judged by a military tribunal. 85. Benin welcomed efforts to promote education, health care and children’s rights. It noted legislative reforms to protect women, children and girls against violence, negligence and exploitation. 86. Bhutan noted that the education and health-care systems of Singapore had resulted in an increase in the well-being of its citizens. 87. The Plurinational State of Bolivia recognized advances on education and health. It welcomed the signing of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and encouraged its prompt ratification. 88. Botswana noted measures to fight human trafficking. It also encouraged expediting the ratification of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination. It expressed concern that Muslim women did not enjoy equal rights regarding family, marriage and divorce. 89. Brazil appreciated policies to enhance social protection, and investments in education. It noted laws and policies promoting tolerance among ethnic and religious groups, and also encouraged the prompt ratification of the International Convention. 90. Brunei Darussalam noted the importance attached to quality and affordable health care. It welcomed efforts to provide education bursaries to children from two-thirds of Singaporean households. 91. Burundi welcomed measures to enhance the rights of children and persons with disabilities, as well as the right to housing and measures to combat human trafficking. 92. Cambodia welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and achievements in housing, health care, education, protection of the elderly, and prevention of human trafficking. 93. Germany appreciated positive developments regarding freedom of opinion, especially during the latest elections. It expressed concern about the practice of caning, the death penalty and the situation of foreign workers.

94. Chile noted the progress in implementing previous universal periodic review recommendations. 95. China noted achievements in housing, health, education and social services, racial equality and freedom of religion, and measures to combat human trafficking. 96. Colombia welcomed the establishment of an Inter-ministerial Committee on Human Rights to follow up and implement recommendations. 97. The Congo appreciated the ratification of the main international human rights instruments. 98. Costa Rica underscored social and development policies to address inequality, while expressing concern about restrictions on peaceful demonstrations and freedom of expression. 99. Cuba welcomed efforts to strengthen social protection and improve health care, including the Progressive Wage Model and MediShield Life, and the national action plan for the elderly. 100. Cyprus welcomed reforms to enhance social protection, particularly for the elderly and low-income earners, and to improve health care and housing. 101. The Czech Republic appreciated the responses to its advance questions. 102. The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea welcomed efforts to strengthen social protection, health care and care for the elderly, and to protect women and girls, children and persons with disabilities. 103. Denmark asked what concrete steps had been taken to ratify the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. 104. Ecuador welcomed efforts to promote intercultural and religious harmony, and to protect the rights of older persons and persons with disabilities. 105. Egypt welcomed extensive social protection measures for older persons and groups with limited income in areas of housing, education and health. 106. Ethiopia appreciated the efficient health-care systems, lifelong learning and access to education, and improved social protection. 107. Fiji welcomed efforts to strengthen social cohesion, the national action plan against human trafficking, and the amendment of laws related to gender equality. 108. Finland welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination. It encouraged decriminalization of consensual sexual activity and revoking censorship guidelines discriminating against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons. 109. Singapore planned ahead to meet the needs of an ageing population and advocated a more positive view of older persons. To improve health-care affordability, Singapore enhanced its MediShield Life scheme in 2015 to provide universal health coverage for life, regardless of age or pre-existing conditions. 110. The vision of Singapore was to create “A Nation for All Ages”. It launched an action plan for successful ageing in August 2015 to create a conducive workplace for all ages, and reorganize its health-care system to place more emphasis on prevention and make the delivery of health-care services more appropriate for the ageing population, make its city infrastructure more senior-friendly, and provide a greater range of social activities for its seniors.

111. Singapore invited the Independent Expert on the enjoyment of all human rights by older persons to visit. 112. Singapore improved welfare provisions to vulnerable groups and timely protection, while ensuring they felt safe in their environment. The poor received additional cash assistance above subsidies available to all citizens. Timely and flexible assistance avoided the “cliff effect”. Singapore established 24 Social Service Offices, and there were more than 400 civil society organizations where people could get early help. This also enabled the Government to receive regular feedback to adjust policies to evolving needs. 113. The enabling master plan (2012—2016) made Singapore a friendlier and more accessible place for persons with disabilities. Transport and infrastructure were more wheelchair-accessible, and spending in special education schools increased by 50 per cent in the previous five years. 114. Singapore was strongly committed to its obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. To promote shared parental responsibilities, fathers received up to two weeks’ paternity leave, and working mothers could share a week’s maternity leave with husbands. Singapore also took a gender-sensitive perspective on issues such as health. 115. Singapore planned to enact the Vulnerable Adults Act in 2016 to protect adults who suffered from or were at risk of abuse, neglect or self-neglect. Singapore also planned to amend the Mental Capacity Act to protect the dignity and interest of individuals who lacked the mental capacity to make informed decisions on their own. 116. Responding to questions, Singapore stressed that corporal punishment of young persons was the last resort. It was subject to stringent safeguards, after counselling and alternative disciplinary methods had repeatedly failed. 117. Singapore planned to consider extending the care and protection provisions under the Children and Young Persons Act from 16 to 18 years of age. 118. Singapore underscored that its racial and religious harmony was the result of continuing efforts by the Government, community organizations and citizens. Its Constitution affirmed that all citizens were equal before the law regardless of race, language or religion. The Presidential Council for Minority Rights scrutinized bills to ensure that they did not unfairly discriminate against any race or religion. Singapore implemented an Ethnic Integration Policy to ensure a balanced mix of ethnic communities in public housing, and made English the working language so as not to favour any particular ethnic group. Group Representation Constituencies also ensured that minorities would always be represented in Parliament. 119. The Government regularly engaged ethnic and religious community leaders through the National Steering Committee on Racial and Religious Harmony. The Inter-Racial and Religious Confidence Circles in every constituency brought together different ethnic and religious leaders to organize common activities and nurture trust. Singapore intended to ratify the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination in 2017. 120. Its Constitution enjoined the Government of Singapore to care for the interests of the Malays, the indigenous people of Singapore who were overwhelmingly of the Muslim faith. The Administration of the Muslim Law Act in 1968 established the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore, Syariah Court and Registry of Muslim Marriages, which worked closely together to ensure that the practice of Muslim law in Singapore was progressive and responsive to evolving social contexts, while adhering to the principles of Islam. The madrasas provided an academic education within an Islamic environment. A/HRC/32/17 12 121. Singapore explained how it created better skills, better jobs and better careers as the best form of welfare for its workers. It recently implemented the SkillsFuture initiative to develop an integrated system of education, training and career progression, and foster lifelong learning. It provided grants and subsidies for training and support for leadership development, and fostered collaboration with employers and unions to meet industries’ future manpower needs. 122. The Workfare Income Supplement Scheme was a targeted scheme that helped low-income workers be self-reliant through continued employment through cash supplements, retirement savings top-ups, and up to 95 per cent subsidies for training courses. For sectors facing depressed wages, the Progressive Wage Model set out training requirements in exchange for higher wages. Those efforts contributed to social mobility. 123. Singapore had one of world’s highest migrant worker concentrations. One in three persons in its workforce was foreign. Singapore valued their contributions and was committed to safeguarding their well-being and rights. 124. Surveys showed most migrant workers were happy with their work conditions, and would recommend to their families and friends to work in Singapore. Laws such as the Employment Act provided them the same avenues of justice as locals. Additional safeguards were provided through the Employment of Foreign Manpower Act and the Employment Agencies Act. Those mandated, for instance, that employers give payslips, and that the withholding of passports against workers’ wishes was illegal. Fees that Singapore employment agencies could charge workers were also limited. 125. The Government shared complaints with relevant embassies in Singapore for investigations by local authorities. Singapore had taken a range of actions against more than 2,000 errant employers in 2015. Every complaint of abuse reported was investigated. Singapore was working with civil society to reach out to foreign workers about their rights and where they could seek help. 126. Singapore noted that all types of foreign worker housing must adhere to rules on safety and well-being. The longer-term direction was to improve workers’ living conditions towards larger dormitories with full facilities. 127. Singapore introduced a weekly rest day for foreign domestic workers, and the maximum penalties for abuses of such workers under its Penal Code were 1.5 times the norm. The Government worked with civil society to provide skills training on workers’ rest days. 128. France welcomed the accession of Singapore to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the signature of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination. 129. Georgia highlighted policies to enhance social protection, especially for low- and middle-income citizens, and steps to improve education and health care. It welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities while encouraging ratification of the remaining international instruments. 130. Canada acknowledged accession to the Palermo Protocol. 131. Ghana welcomed the Inter-agency Task Force on Trafficking in Persons and the National Family Violence Networking System. 132. Greece highlighted the progress in access to education for all, women’s empowerment in public, corporate and civil society sectors, and the protection of child victims of violence. A/HRC/32/17

 13 

133. Haiti welcomed progress in achieving ethnic diversity, social harmony and an open immigration policy. 134. The Holy See noted the Inter-Agency Task Force on Trafficking in Persons, and the national plan of action on trafficking in persons. 135. Honduras welcomed the ratification of the Palermo Protocol. 136. India welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the high representation of women in public life, and recent legislative initiatives aimed at preventing trafficking in persons. 137. Indonesia encouraged Singapore to consider developing a comprehensive human rights national action plan and strengthening national human rights institutions in conformity with the principles relating to the status of national institutions for the promotion and protection of human rights (the Paris Principles). 138. The Islamic Republic of Iran appreciated efforts in education, public health and protection of the elderly. 139. Iraq urged ratification of the remaining core international human rights treaties. 140. Ireland noted the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the signature of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, and the national action plan on trafficking in persons. Ireland expressed concern about the resumption of executions in 2014 and reports of restrictions on the right to freedom of peaceful assembly. 141. New Zealand acknowledged that judges were allowed to exercise discretion in imposing the death penalty in some cases. 142. Italy welcomed measures to strengthen social protection and investments aimed at improving education, health care and housing, and the commitment of Singapore to advancing the rights of women and the situation of the elderly. 143. Jamaica welcomed the advances in social cohesion achieved through the promotion of human rights and the rule of law. 144. Japan welcomed measures to provide financial support for lower-income citizens, improve education and health care, promote the rights of persons with disabilities, improve working environments and respond to the challenges of the ageing society. 145. Kazakhstan welcomed the progress in social protection, health, education, housing and women’s rights, and the policy of ensuring equal standing and opportunities to all citizens. 146. Kenya welcomed the progressive social policies that promoted harmony and social inclusion. 147. Kuwait noted achievements in education, health care and the rule of law. 148. Kyrgyzstan noted ethnic and religious diversity in Singapore. It also welcomed policies to promote and protect human rights. 149. The Lao People’s Democratic Republic welcomed the progress in social protection, social harmony, building a fair and inclusive society, gender equality, education and health-care services, and freedom of expression. 150. Latvia welcomed measures to strengthen social protection, in particular to ensure access to quality education for all, enhance gender equality, provide universal health care, and strengthen child protection. A/HRC/32/17 14 151. Lebanon welcomed achievements in education, housing and health care. 152. Libya welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the creation of a government agency to create employment opportunities for persons with disabilities, and efforts to raise awareness on religious tolerance and social harmony. 153. Malaysia noted enhanced socioeconomic protection for low- and middle-income households through improved access to quality education, housing and health care. It welcomed the programmatic strategies to provide care for an ageing population. 154. Maldives welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the signature of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, accession to the Palermo Protocol, and efforts to strengthen the national legislation on trafficking in persons. 155. Mauritius noted the enabling master plan for persons with disabilities, the Prevention of Human Trafficking Act, accession to the Palermo Protocol, and the Inter-Racial and Religious Confidence Circles Steering Committees to promote inter-faith and inter-racial harmony. 156. Mexico welcomed the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. 157. Montenegro welcomed the National Family Violence Networking System, and asked about plans to criminalize domestic violence and marital rape, and ensure that the definition of rape covered any non-consensual sexual act. 158. Morocco welcomed the progress in education, health and housing, as well as various initiatives to promote and protect the rights of children, persons with disabilities and victims of human trafficking. 159. Myanmar welcomed the progress in social protection; health care; the rights of women, children and persons with disabilities; care for migrant workers and their well-being; and preserving social harmony. 160. Namibia welcomed efforts to improve the lives of citizens in all stages, such as the increased spending on education and support of low-income Singaporeans through the Workfare Income Supplement Scheme. 161. Uruguay welcomed social policies for vulnerable sectors while expressing concern about criminalization of homosexual relations. It positively noted that the death penalty was no longer mandatory for some offences. 162. In closing, Ms. Chan said that Singapore would examine each comment and question carefully to consider how to further improve its efforts to realize human rights. 163. She added that Singapore had a strong position on gender equality and would strive to do better. Singapore would actively review the need to repeal marital rape immunity. 164. Ms. Chan expressed appreciation for many delegations’ acknowledgement of the good work by Singapore in strengthening social protection and social harmony. 165. Singapore would continue to consult its citizens and civil society. It would have to chart its own course and adapt its policies to remain relevant in the ever-changing social, economic and political circumstances to serve Singaporeans best. A/HRC/32/17

 15 
 II.  Conclusions and/or recommendations

166. The following recommendations will be examined by Singapore, which will provide responses in due time, but no later than the thirty-second session of the Human Rights Council in June 2016. 166.1 Consider the ratification of the international human rights instruments, to which it is not yet a party (Nicaragua); 166.2 Continue its accession to the core international human rights instruments (Azerbaijan); 166.3 Consider ratifying the human rights treaties, to which Singapore is not yet a party, especially the International Covenants (Costa Rica); Promptly undertake the necessary procedures for ratification of the core human rights treaties, including the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Japan); Consider ratifying other core human rights treaties such as the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (Mauritius); 166.4 Ratify more human rights treaties, especially the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (Israel); 166.5 Sign and ratify the human rights instruments already accepted in the previous review (Uruguay); 166.6 Consider ratifying the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (Ghana); 166.7 Ratify the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (Georgia) (Kenya) (Morocco) (Russian Federation); 166.8 Ratify the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, signed in 2015 (Senegal); Complete the Convention’s ratification process (Turkey); Ratify the Convention at the earliest opportunity (Australia); Work towards ratifying the Convention, which it signed in 2015 (Zimbabwe); 166.9 Ratify all core human rights treaties to which it is not yet a party, including the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination; the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; and the Convention against Torture (Latvia); 166.10 Ratify the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and consider ratifying the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Slovakia); 166.11 Become a party to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its Optional Protocols (Sweden); 166.12 Facilitate acceding to both the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Republic of Korea); Consider acceding to the International

 **
 The conclusions and recommendations have not been edited. 

Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Thailand); 166.13 Consider ratifying the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (Ghana); 166.14 Fulfil its international obligations by ratifying as a matter of priority the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (France); 166.15 Ratify the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (Montenegro) (South Africa); 166.16 Ratify other core international human rights treaties, particularly the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination; the Convention against Torture; and the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (Slovenia); 166.17 Ratify the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its Optional Protocols and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and its Optional Protocol (Finland); 166.18 Ratify the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its Second Optional Protocol; the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and its Optional Protocol; as well as the Convention against Torture (Portugal); 166.19 Take appropriate measures towards acceding to other core international human rights instruments, namely the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination; and the Convention against Torture (Kazakhstan); 166.20 Ratify the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights aiming at the abolition of the death penalty (Montenegro); 166.21 Establish a formal moratorium on the death penalty, with a view to ratifying the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (Australia); 166.22 Consider ratifying the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Ghana); 166.23 Consider the possibility of acceding to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families; and the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children (Egypt); 166.24 Consider ratifying the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; and the Second Optional Protocol thereto (Namibia); 166.25 Remove its reservations to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and sign its Optional Protocol (Sweden);

166.26 Accede to the Convention against Torture (New Zealand); Ratify the Convention against Torture (South Africa) (Switzerland); 166.27 Consider ratifying the Convention against Torture (Ghana); 166.28 Consider ratifying the Convention against Torture, the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families, and ILO Convention 189 (Philippines); 166.29 Intensify its efforts to ratify the Convention against Torture (Denmark); 166.30 Initiate the procedures aimed at ratifying the Convention against Torture (Chile); 166.31 Ratify the Convention against Torture and its Optional Protocol (Cyprus) (Lebanon); 166.32 Ratify the Convention against Torture and Optional Protocol thereto, as well as the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Czech Republic); 166.33 Take concrete steps towards the abolition of the death penalty and corporal punishment, including ratifying the Convention against Torture and its Optional Protocol (Sweden); 166.34 Sign and ratify the Convention against Torture and the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (France); 166.35 Complete the process of accession to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children (Kyrgyzstan); 166.36 Ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child, in particular its Optional Protocol on the sale of children (Senegal); 166.37 Withdraw reservations and declarations made on the occasion of accession to the Convention on the Rights of the Child and gradually incorporate its provisions into domestic law (Uruguay); 166.38 Accede to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children (Ecuador); Ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children (Australia) (Paraguay); 166.39 Consider accession to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children (Albania); 166.40 Continue to work towards completion of necessary internal processes so that it may accede to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children (Bahamas); 166.41 Speed up the consideration of accession to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children (Belarus); 166.42 Consider accession to the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (Peru); Consider ratifying the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (Ghana);

166.43 Ratify the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (Algeria) (Ecuador); 166.44 Sign and ratify the core international human rights instruments, including the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families, the Convention against Torture, the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (Sierra Leone); 166.45 Take efforts toward the accession of international human rights instruments, including the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families and the Convention against Torture (Indonesia); 166.46 Consider ratifying the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (Ghana); 166.47 Ratify the Convention against Discrimination in Education (Benin); 166.48 Consider favourably accession to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Peru); Consider ratifying the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Ghana); 166.49 Accede to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Poland); Ratify the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Benin) (Botswana) (France) (Latvia); Become a party to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Austria); 166.50 Accede to and fully align its national legislation with the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Cyprus) (Portugal); 166.51 Ratify core international human rights instruments, in particular the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families and the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture (Honduras); 166.52 Take measures to ratify ILO Conventions 111 and 189 and to amend the labour legislation so that it also apply to foreign domestic workers and ensure that such workers are entitled to adequate wages, decent working conditions, benefits and access to complaint and redress mechanisms (Brazil); 166.53 Review its policy with respect to the ratification of ILO Convention No. 111 (Trinidad and Tobago); 166.54 Ratify ILO Conventions Nos. 87, 111, 169 and 189 (Benin); 166.55 Ratify the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the Protocol to it, as well as the Convention against Torture (Ukraine); 166.56 Continue to ensure the implementation of ratified human rights treaties (Pakistan); 166.57 Take further steps in order establish an independent national human rights institution giving emphasis to the protection of women’s rights (Greece); 166.58 Continue to improve its legal instruments in the field of human rights and social protection (Tajikistan); A/HRC/32/17

 19 

166.59 Further implement international human rights norms into the national legislation (Uzbekistan); 166.60 Enact comprehensive legislation prohibiting discrimination in employment on the basis of sex, race, ethnicity, religion, age, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status or disability (Canada); 166.61 Review laws and regulations that call for immediate and automatic deportation of migrant workers on health grounds (Uganda); 166.62 Align its legislation to the definition of discrimination against women in accordance with Article 1 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, and adopt laws and policies for the full participation of women in both public and private decision spaces (Paraguay); 166.63 Continue incorporating the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women into its domestic legal system to eliminate all forms of discrimination against women (Serbia); 166.64 Consider incorporating into its legislation a definition of discrimination against women (Timor-Leste); 166.65 Continue efforts to harmonize its legislation and ensure equality between men and women, particularly in marriage and family relations (Botswana); 166.66 Place high priority on the full incorporation of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women into the domestic legal system (Greece); 166.67 Consider adopting laws and policies on the promotion of the full participation of women under equal conditions in decision-making in all sectors of public, political and professional life (Plurinational State of Bolivia); 166.68 Abolish section 377 A of the Penal Code (Norway); 166.69 Take necessary measures to eliminate legislation that criminalizes same-sex relations and to repeal section 377 A of the Penal Code (Slovenia); 166.70 Decriminalize consensual homosexual relations between adults (Spain); 166.71 Revoke legal provisions criminalizing sexual activity between consenting adults (Sweden); 166.72 Repeal laws that criminalize homosexuality (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland); 166.73 Repeal the anti-sodomy law, which criminalizes the private consensual conduct of gay men (United States of America); 166.74 Formally repeal section 377 A of the Penal Code criminalising homosexual acts (Austria); 166.75 Take the necessary measures to eliminate legislation and policies that criminalize, in a direct or an indirect way, same sex relations and discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons (Brazil); 166.76 Eliminate provisions in national legislation that discriminate against women and other groups such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons, including revising the section 377 A of the Penal Code (Czech Republic); A/HRC/32/17 20 166.77 Repeal section 377 A of the Penal Code to decriminalize homosexuality (France); 166.78 Consider de-criminalizing same-sex relations (Greece); 166.79 Enact a national migrant legislation to protect the rights of migrant workers and ensure that migrant workers who wish to pursue claim against employers are not forced to repatriate without access to justice (Afghanistan); 166.80 Abolish corporal punishment as a legal penalty, in particular caning (Switzerland); 166.81 Establish both domestic violence and marital violence as crimes under domestic law in accordance with international standards (Paraguay); 166.82 Criminalize gender violence and modify the definition of rape to define it as non-consensual sex within or outside marriage (Spain); 166.83 Criminalize explicitly domestic violence and marital rape and make sure that the definition of rape is in line with international standards, and take steps to facilitate the reporting of domestic and sexual violence and protect victims (Belgium); 166.84 Continue working on the legislation on domestic violence crimes, particularly regarding the inclusion of a definition of sexual violence that also encompasses any non-consented sexual act within marriage (Colombia); 166.85 Introduce legislation to make marital rape illegal in all circumstances (Canada); 166.86 Decriminalize defamation and make it a civil offence in accordance with international standards (Belgium); 166.87 Ensure the full enjoyment of the right to freedom of expression and to peaceful assembly and revise its national legislation, inter alia the Internal Security Act and the Newspaper and Printing Presses Act, in order to eliminate media censorship and prevent self-censorship, in this regard, protect bloggers from persecution and harassment for the exercise of their human rights (Czech Republic); 166.88 Review media laws to align them with international human rights standards on freedom of expression (Latvia); 166.89 Adopt legislative measures to permit the realization of peaceful demonstrations and promote freedom of expression (Costa Rica); 166.90 Review existing legislation to enhance the exercise of the right to freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly (Italy); 166.91 Consider the necessary legislations and policies to effectively guarantee the protection and promotion of freedoms of expression, peaceful assembly and association (Mexico); 166.92 Review the use of anti-defamation laws and the registration process for civil society and associations to ensure that such laws are consistent with the right to freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly, and do not constitute a de facto ban on peaceful public demonstrations (Canada); 166.93 Enact a law that protects migrants, refugees and asylum seekers (Congo);

166.94 Adopt a comprehensive legislation that guarantees the protection of the rights of migrant workers (Honduras); 166.95 Repeal the law that deports foreign workers suffering from sexually transmitted diseases (Congo); 166.96 Review the nationality law to provide persons born to Singaporean mothers before 15 May 2004 an opportunity to acquire Singaporean nationality (Kenya); 166.97 Enact new legislation for providing early intervention and better protect vulnerable adults from abuse and harm due to neglect and self-neglect (Albania); 166.98 Consider enshrining in law, protection for rights for 16- to 18-year-olds, either by amending the Children and Young Persons Act or through other legislation (Jamaica); 166.99 Strengthen the role of the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Human Rights to allow for the adapting of human rights policies to meet the national concerns in a changing global economic and social environment (Barbados); 166.100 Continue to strengthen its human rights mechanisms and consider establishing a national human rights institution in line with the Paris Principles (Nepal); 166.101 Take steps to establish a national human rights institution in accordance with the Paris Principles (Poland); Consider establishing an independent national human rights institution in accordance with the Paris Principles (Timor-Leste); Consider to establish a national human rights institution in line with the Paris Principles (Malaysia); 166.102 Seriously consider establishing an independent national human rights institution with a wide mandate to protect and promote human rights, especially in cooperation with civil society (Republic of Korea); 166.103 Establish an independent national human rights institution for the protection and promotion of the rights of women (Uganda); 166.104 Establish a national human rights institution in accordance with the Paris Principles (Costa Rica); 166.105 Continue the progress in the human rights policies, and focus on the practices adopted in various sectors concerned with the advancement of the country such as education, health and care for the elderly (Bahrain); 166.106 Provide the Office for Women’s Development with the necessary resources to promote gender equality in all policy areas (Fiji); 166.107 Adopt a National Action Plan to implement the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, as recommended by the Working Group on Business and Human Rights (Netherlands); 166.108 Take steps to carry out recommendations with regard to the implementation of commitments under the Convention on the Rights of the Child (Slovakia); 166.109 Continue commendable efforts to establish the principle of social harmony among the members of the community (Oman);

166.110 Continue to implement policies for the development of its people under the Sustainable Development Goals (Pakistan); 166.111 Continue its efforts to enhance religious tolerance and maintain peaceful co-existence among followers of different religions (Qatar); 166.112 Continue its efforts aimed at strengthening the principles of social justice, and enhance social cohesion (United Arab Emirates); 166.113 Further its endeavours with regard to the smooth and productive activities of the Inter-Racial and Religious Confidence Circles Steering Committees, and continue its efforts to strengthen social harmony in the country (Azerbaijan); 166.114 Further introduce effective measures to enhance gender equity, and to create practical facilities for persons with disabilities to effectively participate in the labour market (Viet Nam); 166.115 Continue taking effective policy and other measures to build a fair and inclusive society (Bhutan); 166.116 Aim at enhancing social cohesion through laws and policies to meet the changing political, economic and social demands of the people to safeguard social harmony (China); 166.117 Continue preserving social harmony, as a diverse cultural and linguistic nation, to build a fair and inclusive society (Ethiopia); 166.118 Continue its efforts in education, knowledge and public health, and achieve religious tolerance and social cohesion as it represents an important basis to strengthen the principles of human rights (Iraq); 166.119 Continue with efforts related to the enhancement of harmony between various religious and ethnical sects (Libya); 166.120 Continue efforts to maintain harmony among ethnic and religious groups in society (Morocco); 166.121 Raise the level of human rights awareness in society (Bahrain); 166.122 Continue its engagement with Governments and civil society organizations on initiatives that help promote and protect human rights (Philippines); 166.123 Carry out general awareness-raising campaigns aimed at combating discrimination in all its forms (Chile); 166.124 Continue with the actions of the Inter-ministerial Committee on Human Rights, which provides follow-up to human rights recommendations (Paraguay); 166.125 Continue its engagement with the Human Rights Council by bringing into domestic law the recommendations accepted in its first universal periodic review process (Barbados); 166.126 Extend a standing invitation to the Human Rights Council’s Special Procedures (Poland); Extend a standing invitation to all special procedures (Honduras); Extend a standing invitation to all special mandate holders (Latvia); 166.127 Consider issuing a standing invitation to special procedures mandate holders (Slovenia);

166.128 Reinforce the effective protection of the elderly people (Tajikistan); 166.129 Continue to take measures to protect the rights of the elderly and persons with disabilities (Uzbekistan); 166.130 Deepen the legal initiatives and their enforcement aimed at ensuring a legal and de facto situation that guarantees the human rights of migrants (Peru); 166.131 Continue providing migrants and their families access to education, health care, and housing at par with its citizens (Philippines); 166.132 Continue its ongoing efforts to promote and protect economic, social and cultural rights of migrant workers in Singapore, including efforts to enhance reach out to migrant workers on their employment rights, responsibilities, and their avenues of recourse (Sri Lanka); 166.133 Take the necessary steps to prohibit employers from withholding their foreign workers’ passports, travel documents, and work permits as well as to improve access to comprehensive and affordable health services (Thailand); 166.134 Improve the situation of work migrants by enabling them to easily switch employers and to have access to decent housing. The provisions of the Employment Act should also apply to foreign domestic workers (Germany); 166.135 Protect the legitimate rights of foreign workers in Singapore and help them get the necessary vocational training (China); 166.136 Continue safeguarding the well-being and rights of migrant workers in Singapore and reach out to migrant workers to ensure that they understand their employment rights and responsibilities (Cuba); 166.137 Strengthen measures to protect the human rights of non-citizens and migrant workers to prevent their exploitation and discrimination (Mexico); 166.138 Continue efforts at protecting migrant workers and members of their families from exploitation (Myanmar); 166.139 Adopt measures to protect the human rights of migrants, in particular foreign domestic workers through the revision of the legislation that establishes deportation in case of pregnancy or diagnostic of sexually-transmitted diseases such as HIV/AIDS (Colombia); 166.140 Continue to promote and protect migrants and their rights, in particular while countering terrorism (Bangladesh); 166.141 Continue ensuring the rights of women and girls through their empowerment and participation in society (Nicaragua); 166.142 Support the social integration of women in all spheres of life (Tajikistan); 166.143 Take further steps to improve equality between women and men (Timor-Leste); 166.144 Strengthen its awareness-raising programmes to more effectively address gender disparities and discrimination against women (Trinidad and Tobago); 166.145 Continue efforts to eliminate discrimination against women (Uzbekistan);

166.146 Continue its commitment to the principles of gender equality and non-discrimination and maintain the dialogue with the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (Barbados); 166.147 Intensify efforts to eliminate all forms of discrimination against women, among other measures, to promote their empowerment and participation in public life (Mexico); 166.148 Enhance efforts to promote gender equality and combat all forms of discrimination and violence against women and girls (Italy); 166.149 Pursue its efforts to providing women and children with all their rights (Kuwait); 166.150 Allow single mothers to enjoy the same benefits as married mothers (Haiti); 166.151 Assess benefits and social support for single, unwed mothers, to ensure that the current system does not foster multi-generational social exclusion (Jamaica); 166.152 Continue to take measures to combat racial discrimination (Russian Federation); 166.153 Promote and protect the rights of indigenous peoples, peasants and other people working in rural areas (Plurinational State of Bolivia); 166.154 Remove discriminatory media guidelines to provide a more balanced representation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons (Canada); 166.155 Continue to promote awareness programmes on HIV/AIDS, and enhance cooperation with civil society to address the stigma faced by persons with HIV/AIDS (Malaysia); 166.156 Re-establish the moratorium on executions with a view to its abolition (Spain); Re-establish a moratorium on executions with a view to the complete abolition of the death penalty (Netherlands); Re-establish a moratorium with a view to abolishing the death penalty (Sierra Leone); Re-establish a moratorium on executions with a view of abolishing the death penalty (Slovenia); Re-establish a moratorium on executions in line with General Assembly resolutions and with a view to abolishing the death penalty completely (Finland); Re-establish a moratorium on executions with a view to abolishing the death penalty (Holy See); Re-establish a moratorium on executions with a view to a complete abolition of the death penalty (Honduras); 166.157 Re-establish a moratorium on executions, with a view to the complete abolition of the death penalty, and prohibit the imposition of the death penalty against persons with mental and intellectual disabilities (South Africa); Prohibit the execution of persons with mental and intellectual disabilities (Spain); 166.158 Establish a moratorium on executions with a view to abolishing the death penalty (Norway); Establish a moratorium on executions with a view to formally abolishing the death penalty (Portugal); Establish a moratorium on the death penalty (Switzerland); Establish a moratorium on executions, with a view to abolishing the death penalty (France); Establish a moratorium of capital executions with a view to fully abolish the death penalty (Italy); A/HRC/32/17

 25 

Establish as soon as possible a moratorium on the death penalty with a view to its complete abolition (Mexico); 166.159 Enhance its efforts to abolish the death penalty (Panama); 166.160 Consider establishing a formal moratorium on executions of those sentenced to death (Argentina); 166.161 Eliminate the mandatory character of the death penalty with a view to abolishing capital punishment altogether. In the meantime, establish a moratorium on executions (Germany); 166.162 Advance towards the definitive abolition of the death penalty, adopting during this process a general moratorium on its application (Chile); 166.163 Take further action so as to completely abolish the death penalty after lifting in 2014 its de facto moratorium imposed in 2011 (Greece); 166.164 Introduce further measures to restrict the use of the death penalty and consider the re-establishment of the moratorium on executions as first steps towards eventual abolition of the death penalty (Ireland); 166.165 Consider taking steps to eliminate all mandatory death penalty sentences, and impose a moratorium on the application of the death penalty with the view of abolishing it (Namibia); 166.166 Modify domestic law with a view to abolishing the mandatory death penalty and, during this process, establish a general moratorium on already existing death sentences (Uruguay); 166.167 Abolish the death penalty (Paraguay); 166.168 Go further and abolish the death penalty in practice and in law (New Zealand); 166.169 Eliminate the mandatory character of caning as a first step with a view to abolishing this practice altogether (Germany); 166.170 Put an end to the practice of corporal punishment (France); 166.171 Cease the use of caning as a form of punishment (New Zealand); 166.172 Abolish the punishment of caning, particularly those who have exceeded the period stated in the Visa or the residency (Lebanon); 166.173 Ensure that nobody can be detained without trial and revise relevant laws (ISA, CLTPA, MSA, UPA) accordingly (Germany); 166.174 Continue efforts to protect children against violence (Algeria); 166.175 Take additional measures to protect child victims of violence (Kyrgyzstan); 166.176 Raise the minimum age to 18 of young people eager to join the army (Haiti); 166.177 Harmonize the definition of the child in domestic law and put an end to the voluntary recruitment of minors into the army (Belgium); 166.178 Continue to exert efforts to combat trafficking in persons through the implementation of the Prevention of Human Trafficking Act in accordance with its obligations under the Palermo Protocol (Qatar); A/HRC/32/17 26 166.179 Take adequate measures to prevent trafficking in women and children and to strengthen the protection of victims of human trafficking (Serbia); 166.180 Consolidate the progress already made in the fight against human trafficking by guaranteeing the prosecution and punishment of the perpetrators and the protection and rehabilitation of victims (Spain); 166.181 Continue efforts to combat human trafficking and to protect victims of such crimes, especially women and children (Sri Lanka); 166.182 Ensure proper investigation, prosecution and adequate sanctions in all cases of human trafficking, including through the training of relevant personnel (Turkey); 166.183 Continue to develop strategies to promote public awareness of the issue of trafficking in persons (Bahamas); 166.184 Continue enhancing its efforts to combat trafficking in persons, and protecting the victims (Cuba); 166.185 Further strengthen its measures to combat all forms of trafficking in women and children and protecting and rehabilitating its victims (Egypt); 166.186 Allocate adequate resources to train the relevant authorities to ensure the effective implementation of the Prevention of Human Trafficking Act (Fiji); 166.187 Continue its efforts to guarantee the protection and rehabilitation of the victims of trafficking in persons, especially for women and children (Holy See); 166.188 Take measures in the legislative sphere and policy measure to strengthen mechanisms for combating trafficking (Honduras); 166.189 Strengthen its efforts for protecting victims of trafficking in persons and organize awareness-raising programmes in favour of public on issues related to combating human trafficking (Islamic Republic of Iran); 166.190 Continue combating trafficking in persons, and provide protection to its victims (Lebanon); 166.191 Preserve its criminal justice system to reinforce rule of law (Bangladesh); 166.192 Take appropriate measures to establish equal choice of jurisdiction between Sharia courts and family courts (Argentina); 166.193 Adapt its legislation to ensure that all arrested and detained persons can swiftly appear before a judge and in conformity with international law (Switzerland); 166.194 Replace the Internal Security Act and the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act with laws that mandate that an accused person has a trial in court (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland); 166.195 Adopt legislation to ensure that all cases of arrest and detention without warrant, also those under the Internal Security Act, are subject to speedy, independent and regular judicial review (Austria); 166.196 Harmonize domestic law regarding the minimum age of criminal responsibility, and raise it (Uruguay); A/HRC/32/17

 27 

166.197 Maintain its effective protection for the family as the natural and fundamental unit of the society (Egypt); 166.198 Continue improving all the conditions for worship, and strengthen awareness and dissemination of the values of tolerance and peace (United Arab Emirates); 166.199 Preserve its social harmony through retaining its existing legal provisions that allow various religious populations to live and practice their religion without stigma (Bangladesh); 166.200 End the practice of using defamation lawsuits and other legal and administrative actions to censor, fine, and imprison individuals for speaking or writing on political issues, and remove all discriminatory media guidelines (United States of America); 166.201 Ensure freedom of assembly and association, freedom of opinion and expression, including on the Internet, and protect freedom of the press (France); 166.202 Ensure that freedom of opinion and expression are encouraged and protected, including for individuals and organizations communicating via online public platforms (New Zealand); 166.203 Consider alternative, effective interventions for persons who violate national laws or norms regarding religious or cultural sensibilities through publication or posting of offensive material (Jamaica); 166.204 Take appropriate measures to ease restrictions on freedom of expression and freedom of the media (Japan); 166.205 Reform the regime of defamation offences, which has a chilling effect on freedom of expression (France); 166.206 That relevant laws, including the Public Order Act and the Public Entertainment and Meeting Act not be invoked to curtail the right to freedom of peaceful assembly, including that of civil society (Ireland); 166.207 Establish an independent electoral commission with a mandate to determine constituency boundaries and monitor election fundraising and campaigning (United States of America); 166.208 Continue expanding the participation of women in the national public life (Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela); 166.209 Strengthen efforts to promote women’s participation in public life, particularly at the higher corporate levels (Bahamas); 166.210 Encourage women’s political participation and increase representation of women in decision-making (Maldives); 166.211 Continue its efforts so as to realize the right to work, including through technical and vocational education and training (Egypt); 166.212 Initiate a national dialogue on a universal minimum wage (Haiti); 166.213 Include domestic work among the fields covered by the Employment Act, which would significantly improve the situation of many migrant workers (Austria); A/HRC/32/17 28 166.214 Continue increasing the benefits of its social services for the population to obtain a greater efficiency of its excellent social welfare system (Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela); 166.215 Continue its ongoing efforts and commitment to uphold the lives of its people through the provision of best education, housing and medical care (Cambodia); 166.216 Continue implementing its social policies and programmes with a view to strengthening social harmony, in particular to help the elderly and the low-income citizens (Cambodia); 166.217 Allocate sufficient funds and undertake effective measures to provide adequate assistance to the elderly people (Viet Nam); 166.218 Accelerate the building of more general and community hospitals and clinics under the Healthcare 2020 Master plan (Zimbabwe); 166.219 Explore the expansion of health and safety regulations to cover non-medical practitioners and conduct regular monitoring of their activities (Jamaica); 166.220 Improve access to education and health-care services of vulnerable people, including women and children from low and middle income families (Lao People’s Democratic Republic); 166.221 Continue to provide the subsidies and financial support through its MediShield Life Policy for all its citizens and permanent residents, especially the elderly and needy (Brunei Darussalam); 166.222 Continue to develop inclusive education and strengthen life-long education (Belarus); 166.223 Take further steps to ensure its people, especially children, will continue to enjoy access to affordable education (Brunei Darussalam); 166.224 Continue developing programmes aimed at providing equal access to quality education for vulnerable groups, with a special emphasis on the inclusion of persons with disabilities and children under poverty conditions guaranteeing gender equality (Chile); 166.225 Adopt further measures to ensure the full enjoyment of rights of persons with disabilities, particularly in education and access to services (Israel); 166.226 Continue the efforts aimed at providing more opportunities to persons with disabilities and enabling them to become an integral part of the society (Oman); 166.227 Continue its efforts to improve health care, education and care provided for persons with disabilities (Saudi Arabia); 166.228 Ensure that the Compulsory Education Act provides for children with disabilities (Uganda); 166.229 Continue its strive to build an inclusive society where persons with disabilities are given every opportunity to become integral and contributing members (Islamic Republic of Iran); 166.230 Continue to ensure care services and equal access of employment opportunities for persons with disabilities (Lao People’s Democratic Republic); A/HRC/32/17

 29 

166.231 Continue and strengthen efforts to integrate children with disabilities to mainstream education (Maldives); 166.232 Take appropriate measures to ensure that mandatory basic education includes children with disabilities (Kuwait); 166.233 Continue to adopt measures to provide for adequate treatment to refugees, in particular through the adoption of procedures or protection mechanisms to refugee claimants, especially non-accompanied boys, girls and adolescents (Colombia); 166.234 Enact laws covering the right of children to acquire nationality, in particular those born in Singapore who cannot obtain another nationality (Panama); 166.235 Raise awareness on the impact of climate change (Haiti); 166.236 Intensify fighting radicalization and terrorism at its early stage to sustain the enjoyment of human rights and basic freedoms of all Singaporeans (Ethiopia). 167. All conclusions and/or recommendations contained in the present report reflect the position of the submitting State(s) and/or the State under review. They should not be construed as endorsed by the Working Group as a whole.

AnnexEdit

Composition of the delegationEdit

The delegation of Singapore was headed by Ambassador-at-Large Chan Heng Chee, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and composed of the following members:

• Mr. Foo Kok Jwee, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Singapore to the United Nations;

• Ms. Vanessa Chan, Director-General, International Organisations Directorate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs;

• Ms. Thian Yee Sze, Director-General, Legal Group, Ministry of Law;

• Mr. Alvin Lim, Divisional Director, Workplace Policy and Strategy Division, Ministry of Manpower;

• Mr. Lim Shung Yar, Director, Community Relations and Engagement Division, Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth;

• Ms. Janice Tan, Director, International Relations, International Cooperation & Partnerships Division, Ministry of Home Affairs;

• Ms. Gwenda Fong, Director, Successful Ageing, Ageing Planning Office, Ministry of Health;

• Ms. Ang Bee Lian, Director, Social Welfare, Ministry of Social and Family Development;

• Ms. Chetra Sinnathamby, Director, Content & Standards (Films, Video Games & Arts), Media Development Authority;

• Ms. Diane Tan, Acting Director, International Legal, Ministry of Law;

• Mr. Steven Pang, Deputy Director-General, International Organisations Directorate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs;

• Mr. Jonathan Han, Deputy Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Singapore to the United Nations;

• Mr. Jason Tan, Counsellor (Legal), Permanent Mission of Singapore to the United Nations;

• Mr Melvin Yeo Tsin Yaw, Senior Deputy Director-Designate, Community Relations, Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth;

• Ms. Sarala Subramaniam, Deputy Senior State Counsel, International Affairs Division, Attorney-General’s Chambers;

• Mr. Ni De’ En, Deputy Director, NS Policy, Ministry of Defence;

• Ms Sharifah Farah Binte Syed Mahamood Aljunied, Deputy Director, Curriculum and Youth Development, Islamic Religious Council of Singapore (MUIS);

• Mr. Gerard Vinluan, Deputy Director, Communications and International Relations Division, Ministry of Social and Family Development;

• Ms. Yeo Wen Qing, Deputy Director, International Cooperation, Public Health Group, Ministry of Health;

• Ms. Linda Lee, Senior Assistant Director, Communications and International Relations Division, Ministry of Social and Family Development; • Ms. Joy Boo Jia Wen, First Secretary, Permanent Mission of Singapore to the United Nations;

• Ms. Delphia Lim, Assistant Director, International Legal, Ministry of Law; • Ms. Jasmine Pang Xueqin, Senior Manager, Community Relations, Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth;

• Ms. Ong Rui Lin, Senior Manager, Workplace Policy and Strategy Division, Ministry of Manpower;

• Ms. Kristy Lim, Senior Manager, International Cooperation & Partnerships Division, Ministry of Home Affairs;

• Ms. Arvinder Kaur, Assistant Manager, Community Relations, Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth;

• Ms. Ann-Margaret Mathew, Desk Officer, International Organisations Directorate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs;

• Ms. Grace Zhu Manyun, Desk Officer, International Organisations Directorate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs;

• Mr. Bryan Lim, Country Officer, Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • The original PDF of this document published by the United Nations Human Rights Council:[1].

AcknowledgementsEdit

This article was compiled by Roy Tan.

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.